What is mental disorder?

Obsessive-compulsive disorder or dermatoluminesia is a psychiatric disorder in which a person repeatedly removes skin from his skin (usually the skin that is dry on the wounds) and causes damage to his skin.

Obsessive-compulsive disorder occurs in two situations:
A concentrated peeling (that is, a person tensions before he tresses his skin and calms down after healing).
Inhumane scouring (in this case, the person also treads his skin without consciousness and tension).
Treatment
Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a chronic problem that is characterized by the extreme and recurrent skin manipulation that is caused by skin diseases.

Patients have a strong desire to persuade their skin, and it is difficult to control and stop these behaviors. Scouring usually results in tissue damage and apparent deformity in these people. For treatment, it is necessary to determine which one has a type of skin and, in addition to peeling, what other disorders.

Treatment for this disorder is carried out in combination (ie, both medication and psychological treatments). Hearing reversal treatments (HRT), stress and emotional control, attitude and cognitive therapy, and especially cognitive behavioral therapies, can help reduce symptoms. In this process, one needs to learn the techniques of emotional control.

Common Symptoms:
Frequent digestion leading to skin lesions. These skinheads, hands, or arms tend to get bruised more than other areas of the body, and their organs are damaged. These people also have a healthy skin, rugged skin, pimples, or scabies caused by predation. The sufferer does this by using nails, tweezers, pins or nicks, and in some cases, squeezing and rubbing and biting his skin. This behavior lasts several hours a day and lasts for months or years.

Causes of the disease:
Usually they "do it" to escape or to solve their emotional problems and confounding circumstances.

References:

  1. 1-http://www.ijpsy.com/volumen10/num1/256.html
  2. 2-https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1705499/
  3. 3-https://psy.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/42/5/397

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Nastaran Zaferani

Nastaran Zaferani